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How valuable is one hour?


The answer to that question varies, you might say, because different people are paid different amounts for their work. Perhaps their skill levels vary, perhaps they have other people working for them? Perhaps they own a lot of capital and investments all of which pay dividends, rent or interest?

That’s certainly all true, if we measure time in monetary terms.

But, there is another variable, one which is hidden to most of us. At least, if we’re lucky enough.

Most of us are blissfully unaware how many hours will make up our lifespans because none of us know exactly how long we will live. If we’re fortunate enough to make it to the average of 75 years, we’ll have 657,000 hours of life.

For children with life threatening diseases, that number can be much, much lower. How valuable then is each hour? How much more precious each minute?

The real answer is that each hour of our lives is priceless, it can never be replaced.

Would you give what you earn in one hour of your life to help someone live a little better, or longer?

That’s all we’re asking. We’re signing up as many people as we can to pledge whatever they earn, large or small, in one hour on the longest day of the year, Thursday, 21st June 2018.

If you’re retired or not working you can also take part, please just choose how much you would like to pledge and enter it in the box below.

Please help us. However much you pledge; your gift of time is priceless.



£0.00 of £10,000.00 pledged



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*I am a UK taxpayer and understand that if I pay less Income Tax and/or Capital Gains Tax in the current tax year than the amount of Gift Aid claimed on all my donations it is my responsibility to pay any difference.
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This pledge campaign will support...

Alder Hey Children's Hospital to buy an ‘ICON’ paediatric wide field retinal camera.

Who say...

"Examinations of the eye, in particular the inside of the eye require highly specialised equipment. Alder Hey Children’s Hospital’s Ophthalmology department treats over 17,000 children and young people each year and we receive referrals from Merseyside, the north west, Wales and the Isle of Man.

This equipment which is specifically designed for use in paediatric healthcare settings will allow us to take high definition, wide-angled, colour images of children’s eyes.

The ‘ICON’ will help us to successfully treat a number of conditions which can lead to lifelong poor vision and in some cases blindness. It will have particular impact on the diagnosis and treatment of three main groups of patients:

  • Premature babies who have a condition called ‘retinopathy of prematurity’. This condition is caused when normal retinal development is compromised following a premature birth.
  • Babies and children who have Retinoblastoma, a rare type of eye cancer which is almost exclusively diagnosed in babies and young children, under the age of five.
  • Babies and very young children who are victims of non-accidental head injuries. In these cases, trauma to the head can affect the retinas and cause bleeding and detachments. Being able to recognise these injuries in the retina can be the first step in removing a child from a dangerous home situation and also safeguard any siblings.

By purchasing this equipment we will be able to ensure that many hundreds of ophthalmic patients will receive a fast and accurate diagnosis."


This pledge campaign will support...

Alder Hey Children's Hospital to buy an ‘ICON’ paediatric wide field retinal camera.

Who say...

"Examinations of the eye, in particular the inside of the eye require highly specialised equipment. Alder Hey Children’s Hospital’s Ophthalmology department treats over 17,000 children and young people each year and we receive referrals from Merseyside, the north west, Wales and the Isle of Man.

This equipment which is specifically designed for use in paediatric healthcare settings will allow us to take high definition, wide-angled, colour images of children’s eyes.

The ‘ICON’ will help us to successfully treat a number of conditions which can lead to lifelong poor vision and in some cases blindness. It will have particular impact on the diagnosis and treatment of three main groups of patients:

  • Premature babies who have a condition called ‘retinopathy of prematurity’. This condition is caused when normal retinal development is compromised following a premature birth.
  • Babies and children who have Retinoblastoma, a rare type of eye cancer which is almost exclusively diagnosed in babies and young children, under the age of five.
  • Babies and very young children who are victims of non-accidental head injuries. In these cases, trauma to the head can affect the retinas and cause bleeding and detachments. Being able to recognise these injuries in the retina can be the first step in removing a child from a dangerous home situation and also safeguard any siblings.

By purchasing this equipment we will be able to ensure that many hundreds of ophthalmic patients will receive a fast and accurate diagnosis."